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Book Baskets in the K-2 Classroom

(These baskets would work well for book baskets. They just need fewer books in each one.)

Do you use book baskets in your classroom? Do you want to but just can’t find the time to manage them? Do you wonder if you are using them in the most effective manner? Read on to find out how to use Book Baskets effectively in your classroom and manage them quickly and easily.

Do I need Book Baskets?

Yes! Yes! Yes! Did I say yes? Yes!

I’ll be the first to admit, I did it wrong when I first started using book baskets. In the beginning it was just a basket of books on the table for Self Selected Reading (SSR) time. As time went on, I figured out how to use individualized book baskets in a meaningful and productive way. All students were on task and they didn’t take much effort to manage.

First Steps….

Get a basket for every student and a few spares for new students. Find a place to house them permanently in your classroom where they are easy for students to access. That’s it!!! Setting them up is that easy.

Don’t go grab a bunch of books and stick them in the baskets. You’re going to populate your baskets with the books you use during Guided Reading. In this way, students have books they are familiar with to practice independently. You’re not going to change them out too frequently either, because you want them to have some books below their current reading level because this is how children develop fluency and confidence.

Examples…

Sara, aged 6, an above average reader in September of first grade. Let’s look in her book basket……

Level E – How an Orange Grows

Level E – Miss Potter is an Otter

Level F – My Best Friend

Level F – Funny Fish

Level G – Who Makes this Sound?

Right now, Sara has these 5 books in her basket. She’s been in school for 3 or 4 weeks now and has done Guided Reading lessons with all of the books above. All the students in her reading group have the same books. After working with the book for 3-5 days in guided reading, the students were told to put the book in their book basket. By now, the level E books are very easy for Sara to read but as she rereads them she is developing fluency. Another benefit is that she is paired up at center time with Angel (see her basket below) and she reads these books that are above Angel’s reading level aloud and Angel gets the benefit of hearing a fluent reader and being exposed to some vocabulary above that which she can read. Notice also, that she has a mixture of literary and non-fiction type texts as any good book basket does.

Angel, aged 6, a below average student in first grade. Let’s look in her book basket….

Level aa – I Like

Level aa – This Is A …

Level A – Mom and Dad

Level A – Jobs

Level A – At The Zoo

Notice that Angel also has 5 books but she only has two different levels. Angel may be moving slower because she had to do some letter sound work at the beginning of the year instead of jumping straight into reading. She might also have a little stack of sight words on index cards to practice. Her books are all emergent readers with repetitive text (“I like dogs. I like cats. I like birds.”) She can figure out the text by looking at the pictures and using the repetitive pattern. However, when she is in centers with Sara and they get out their book baskets, she is also a 6 year old, so she is interested in the books that Sara has too. They may look at all their books or I might suggest they take turns reading aloud one book from their basket. “Ms. Foster, why didn’t I get that book that Sara has?” “Because I only have 6 copies of each book so I can’t give the same book to everyone at the same time. You’ll get that one in your basket later.” They generally buy this as an excuse, there isn’t really a need to go into their differing needs as readers. However, as the year progresses, you may want to set goals and help them begin to monitor their own progress, turning their differences into something to be celebrated and worked on.

Managing the baskets

In the data binder that I keep at my reading table, I have pre-assessment data on each student and running records showing their progress throughout the year. Each student has their own tab in the binder so I can flip to their information quickly. On the back side of the tab divider I write the books as I give them to the students. After they have more than 3 or 4 levels in their basket, I collect the first ones I gave them, and mark them off the list. I do this as part of their guided reading group and it only takes a few moments. When I give a group a book for their basket, I quickly jot the level and title (or an abbreviation of it:) on the tab divider for each of those 4 or 5 students. It literally takes less than one minute. When I’m ready to take back a book, I ask students to bring their book baskets to their reading group and I tell them which book to turn in and mark through it on their tab divider. This also takes less than a minute. It also keeps them honest, because those guided reading sets are expensive, belong to the school and you will need them year after year so you don’t want them going home in book bags. Below is a sample of what Sara and Angel’s tab dividers might look like in December.

Sara

  • Level E – How an Orange Grows
  • Level E – Miss Potter is an Otter
  • Level F – My Best Friend
  • Level F – Funny Fish
  • Level G – Who Makes this Sound?
  • Level G – Furry’s New Friends
  • Level H – Furry Has a Nightmare
  • Level H – Water Everywhere
  • Level I – Rocks, Rocks, Rocks
  • Level I – A Parrot Named Ox
  • Level I – Airplanes
  • Level J – George Goes Bonkers

Sara still has three levels in her basket, 5 books, (it’s okay to have more but keep it under about 8).  She stagnated a little bit on level I and we worked on three books at that level instead of two before she accomplished it.  However, I am not concerned because she is already starting level J which is the goal for the end of first grade and it’s only December!  I’m going to be careful with Sara and her group because I don’t want to just keep pushing them UP through the levels.  I want to make sure to give them a good solid foundation by looking at the many standards they can master at each level even if they can easily read the texts.  How is comprehension?  Other grammar skills I can include such as compound words, commas, etc.?

Now let’s look at Angel.

  • Level aa – I Like
  • Level aa – This Is A …
  • Level A – Mom and Dad
  • Level A – Jobs
  • Level A – At The Zoo
  • Level A – I Can Help
  • Level B – Bear’s Fish
  • Level B – Things That Go
  • Level B – Cars
  • Level B – Pets Are Fun

Angel is not progressing at a pace that will allow her to keep up let alone catch up.  I would already have an intervention in place for Angel.  Just from the book basket point of view, I would leave more books in the basket because it is taking her longer to get through each level so she is going to be tired of the books more quickly.  I also might add in items such as additional sight words to work on or a “PALS” reading segment, and so on.

The book baskets are differentiated to each student’s needs and are useful for independent reading, reading with a partner, and self selected reading.

I hope these tips will help you boldly incorporate book baskets into your primary classroom!

Baseline Data

The what, why and how of collecting baseline data in the first days of school.

What?

The “what?” is determined by your grade level and your standards. Each grade has certain “Power Standards” that are building blocks for that grade level and prerequisites for the next grade. If you are a new teacher, you will find out what these standards are when you are planning with your grade level.

Consider this example. First grade has literally dozens of reading/ela standards. One standard covers how to use commas in a series while another states that students can read on level text with purpose and understanding. A first grader can move on to second grade and be successful even if they did not master where to put commas in a series but they cannot be successful in second grade if they did not master reading on first grade level text with purpose and understanding. That is a power standard. You will want to see what level the student is reading on in your baseline data because that is something you will want to track all year long and will be a factor in determining readiness for second grade at the end of the year. In contrast, you will certainly teach and formatively assess the standard about commas but it does not warrant a place in your baseline data.

Why?

Why gather baseline data at all? You are going to assess the students summatively at the end of units, quarters, the year. The summative information will ultimately inform your decision about readiness to promote, so why bother with diagnostic or baseline data?

First all all, we live in an era of accountability in which we are required to justify our methods, materials and even our pedagogy. The gathering of baseline data allows you to prove student progress, prove why you are using the method or materials that you are using and prove the need each young learner has, in a very specific way.

Secondly, baseline data gives you a starting point for instruction. It tells you what your students already know and what they need to know. You are able to be your most effective when you can provide direct instruction and practice on precisely the skills students need to acquire.

Thirdly, baseline data is essential to tracking student progress, or lack thereof. When you gather baseline data in the first week of school, you will be able to identify struggling students within the first few weeks when you see they are not making progress from their baseline. You will be able to deliver remediation or reteaching quickly and prevent a huge learning gap from developing. In the lower elementary grades especially, it is a responsibility of the teacher to identify students who may have innate learning difficulties that will require extra, ongoing interventions. The baseline data is just the first data point in this process. The process is quicker and more efficient, thus providing the student with the help they need that much sooner.

Lastly, there is a wealth of research out there suggesting that when the student and the teacher know exactly where the student is academically; students tend to grow more and quicker. Giving a diagnostic assessment with the right attitude “It’s okay if you don’t already know this; I just want to see what you already know.” allows students to see that they do have something they need to learn, which in itself can be impetus enough for them to engage in learning.

How?

How do you collect diagnostic/baseline data? You’ve heard the expression “There’s more than one way to skin a cat.” Although I don’t agree with skinning cats; I agree there are many ways to assess. There are multiple ways to gather this data and you can use the method that works best for you.

  • Whole group – some data can be gathered in a whole group setting. For example, math computation can be done whole group because you are looking to see if a child can compute the correct answer (be sure to use privacy boards or folders to prevent copying.)
  • Small group – some data can be gathered in small groups. For example, a second grade teacher may want to do the math computation in small group if she is also taking note of who still uses their fingers to count, and so on.
  • Individual – in a perfect world, we would have plenty of time to do all of the assessments individually so that we could take note of individual strengths and weaknesses and which strategies the student prefers. However, some assessments MUST be done individually such as reading sight words, naming letters, making letter sounds and reading running records and fluency.

You will make time for these assessments in the first week (or two, at the most) of school because you will not be instructing until you have gathered the baseline data (it informs your instruction, remember?). The transition from summer break to school is difficult for young learners and you can make it easier on them and on your data collection by providing structured play activities that will allow you to work with individuals and small groups to gather data. Activities that are considered developmentally appropriate and also mentally valuable in K-5 are playdough, blocks, legos, puzzles, brain teasers, computer/ipad based activities like ABCya.com, PBS.org, BrainPop and TumbleBooks.

Suggested baselines to gather, by grade:

  • K – write name, recognize letters, recognize letter sounds, sight words, recognize numerals, count sets to 10, addition to 5
  • 1 – sight words, running record (reading level), sight word fluency, addition fluency to 10, subtraction fluency within 10
  • 2 – sight words, running record (reading level), reading fluency, addition fluency to 18, subtraction fluency within 18
  • 3 – running record (reading level), reading fluency, addition fluency to 1,000, subtraction fluency within 1,000, multiplication facts
  • 4 – running record (reading level), reading fluency, addition and subtraction fluency to 10,000, multiplication fluency through 12’s, division fluency within facts to 12’s,
  • 5 – running record (reading level), reading fluency, multiplication fluency through triple times double digit multiplicands and corresponding division as well as creating decimals with division

This is just a basic list of suggestions for some of the heavy hitter standards at each grade level. Your school, your system, your grade level may do others as well.

Which ones do you use for your grade level?

Summertime is organization time

5 Teacher Organizational Tips For Summer

Back To School is less than a month away for most of us!  Here are some things you can do now to make 2019 BTS the best yet!

1. Organize your login/password info. for the million and one websites you use every day during the school year.

I use a manila folder to keep mine handy and organized.  I just write directly onto the folder and keep it in a drawer.  For those that I need a LOT like GoNoodle, United Streaming, etc. I make a little cheat sheet and keep it near my computer.  Click below to download a free template for logins and passwords.password sheets freebie

2. Organize your flash drives and/or Onedrive.

I recently found a great sale at Office Depot on 128GB flash drives for $19.99!   I was able to organize my school and home life in one afternoon!

If you have powerpoints or flipcharts that you use frequently; it’s a good idea to put them onto a flash drive that you keep in or near your computer at school.  Onedrive is awesome for keeping things safe and clutterfree but you know on the day of your “big” evaluation; the school wifi will go down for 15 minutes and you won’t be able to get to that great powerpoint or flipchart you had planned to use during your lesson.

My friend, Bernie, a fellow EIP teacher travels from classroom to classroom so she keeps a flashdrive with all her stuff on a keyfob in her pocket.  She always has what she needs right at the tip of her fingers!

3.  Organize papers.

Your paper needs will depend on what you teach but even in our digital world there is still a need for some paper.  Click here BTS printing checklist freebie for a free checklist of things you might need to print and organize for BTS.  You know the line for the copy machine will be out of control during preplanning and chances are the machine will either break down or run out of toner.  Get ahead of all of that now. If you can get into your school; it’s worth the price of a couple of reams of paper to go use the copier before everyone else does.  If you can’t use the copier at school; consider printing on your printer at home or finding a copy place that gives teacher discounts.

Organizing paper also includes printing, laminating and cutting out stuff you have bought for your classroom.  If you don’t have a way to laminate at least get everything printed and ready for the first day of preplanning.  For example, if you’re committed to using a word wall this year, you will want to get everything printed and cut out and ready because this is the kind of thing that can fall by the wayside once school starts and you have so many things to keep up with.  See my article about Word Walls here.

4.  Organize your personal daily storage.

Lunch bag, book bag, purse, keys, food… If something wasn’t working efficiently last year, now is the time to change it.  Go shopping for a new, more functional item.   I have this rolling bag that I love. Mine is just plain red, I’ve had it 5 or 6 years and it’s still great. Its so easy to pick up by the handles to put it in or take it out of the car and then pull up the long handle to roll.

Think about what irritated you last year and find a better solution.  I was always digging in my purse or bookbag for my car keys or my classroom keys.  So I bought 2 of these heavy duty snap clips and now I clip them to the sides of my purse and I never have a problem finding them.

Are you thinking about food prepping for breakfasts or lunches?  Now is the time to find the containers you want to use and try them out.

5. Organize your storage.

It’s time to make those bucket or crate stools you have pinned 500 pictures of on pinterest.  Just do it!  You will be amazed at how easy it is to organize your manipulatives and other teaching materials.  This is how I organized mine using bucket stools.  I made 6 bucket stools when I taught first grade (one for each math unit and also a good number to go around the reading table)  I printed a label for each bucket (Unit 1: Numbers and Counting, Unit 2:…) Then I stored the manipulatives I needed for each unit inside each bucket.  It worked great!  I knew everything I would need to teach a lesson, do a small group, or set up a center was in the bucket for that unit.  Now I’m an EIP teacher and I go to many different classrooms but I still use my buckets for storage and I can quickly and easily find materials I need to take with me to teach a lesson.

What do you do in the summer to get ready for Back to School?

Share your tips in the comments.

Do’s and Don’ts for Word Walls

Thinking about creating a word wall?
Wanting to use your word wall more effectively?
Not sure how to use a word wall?

Every elementary classroom should have one.  Read on to learn how to use yours effectively.

8 Do’s  for Word Walls

  1. Do put it where students can reach all words
  2. Do begin with a blank word wall
  3. Do add words as you work on them
  4. Do interact with the wall daily
  5. Do teach students to use it as a resource for writing
  6. Do pull words off to create sentences
  7. Do let students “teach” using pointers and slappers
  8. Do have fun with it

8 Don’ts for Word Walls

  1. Don’t put it near the ceiling
  2. Don’t put up all the words before the 1st day
  3. Don’t put up words without students
  4. Don’t ignore the word wall
  5. Don’t forget about the word wall
  6. Don’t treat it like a decoration
  7. Don’t forbid students to touch it
  8. Don’t be afraid to use it

Let’s talk about Word Walls!  I have been teaching long enough to remember when Word Walls were something new.  They were originally part of a program called “4 Blocks” by Patricia Cunningham.  I remember getting the training and    being excited about using a Word Wall in my classroom.  Since then they have become a mainstream component of elementary classrooms.  Unfortunately, not everyone is using them to their full advantage.  With very little effort, a Word Wall can be a powerful tool for student learning.

I have provided you with a quick list of Do’s and Don’ts for Word Walls.  Let’s dig a little deeper into the Do’s and look at how to use the walls effectively.

  1. Do put it where students can reach all words

Dedicate a wall in your classroom.  I have taught in many sizes and shapes of rooms too so I know it can be a challenge  because of activboards, doors, windows, computer hookups, etc.  However, there is always one wall that can be used.  A large bulletin board can work too.  For the wall to be effective, students need to be able to see it, touch it and get up close to it.  If you look closely at this picture you will see that some of the lower letters are not crisp and smooth because they have been touched and rubbed against as students worked around the word wall.  A Word Wall is a tool it is not going to stay clean and neat all the time. And that’s okay!

       2. Do begin with a blank Word Wall

It’s tempting to go ahead and put it all up during preplanning.  Don’t do it!  Put up the labels and if parents question you during open house tell them “We will put up the words together in class as a learning activity!”  Here is a picture of a little sweetie (clipart mask hides her true identity;) on the first or second day of school.  Notice the blank Word Wall behind her.

 3. Do add words as you work on them

Incorporate sight words into your ELA lesson.  It’s a standard and you are going to cover it anyway so be systematic about it.  In kindergarten, teach a word, put it on the word wall and then practice writing it and using it in sentences.  In first grade, put up the kindergarten “popcorn” words quickly in the first few days and then add others each week or as needed.  In second grade, the first three Dolch lists will go up quickly because they should have been learned in first grade.  You might focus more on adding math and science words as you learn them.  But leave the sight words up there, many students will need them for spelling in their writing throughout second grade.

  1. Do interact with the wall daily

Use the Word Wall everyday.  Some days you might conduct an entire lesson using the Word Wall.  Other days, it might just be a sponge activity while students are washing hands for lunch.

  1. Do teach students to use it as a resource for writing

“Teacher, how do you spell…..?”  The spelling issue can fatally disrupt the writing process for many students.  By teaching them to use the Word Wall (and accompanying personal dictionary; if you like…) you can eliminate many of  these problems.  Students enjoy being independent and the process of looking for and finding the word on the Word Wall and then writing it is conducive to long term memory storage.  Win. Win.

  1. Do pull words off to create sentences

Physically pulling the words off the Word Wall to create sentences helps students experience the meaning of each individual part and see how they work together as a whole.  Best practice; ask students to pull the words off and see what they can do!  I will never forget little Jose who after a similar lesson in my first grade classroom, used the Word Wall to write the sentence “I like my teacher.”  It was the first sentence he had ever written!  He cut it out of his journal and gave it to me.  I still have it taped to my pencil holder.  That was just the beginning for little Jose and many others who were energized by the power to create meaning with words!

  1. Do let students “teach” using pointers and slappers

I allow students to use pointers and slappers during whole class work with the Word Wall but I also have the Word Wall as a center during literacy centers.  I have to model this at the beginning of the year, but it is always a favorite with my students.  Here is a picture of a sassy little teacher going to town.  See the feet of her “student” in the rocking chair to the left.  Both students are engaged and learning.

Consider this: when a child says “Let me see..” they always hold their hands out to touch the thing they want to see.  We “see” things better when we touch them.  Allow your students to touch the words and the pointers and fully experience the Word Wall.

*a slapper is a flyswatter used to slap words. It’s very fun:)

  1. Do have fun with it                                                                                      Sing the words, dance while you read them.  Have fun!  Want more ideas for ways to have fun with a Word Wall?  Stay tuned for an upcoming product called Fun With Word Walls.  Follow me on https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Julie-Alderson-Foster to receive notifications when I post new products!
Here are some products that will make putting up and using a Word Wall as simple as pie!

                                                     Word Wall Words    

                                                       Pirate Word Wall 

                                                     Polka Dot Word Wall

                                               Elmer Inspired Word Wall

                                                      Personal Dictionary